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Dan Mask Deangle with Elongated Face Liberia African Art

Regular Price: $250.00

Special Price: $190.00

Product #: 90290
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Title Dan Mask Deangle with Elongated Face Liberia African Mask
Type of Object Mask
Country of Origin Liberia
People Dan
Materials Wood, pigment, vegetal fibers
Approximate Age second half 20th century
Dimensions 13 inches H. x 7 inches W. x 4 inches D.
Overall Condition Good. Most of our pieces have spent decades on at least two continents, and have been treasured by several owners.   Small splits, scrapes and cracks are a normal part of their patina attesting to their age and extensive use.  We examine each piece carefully when we receive it and report any damage we find in our listings.  Please look carefully at the pictures which may also reveal condition and damage.


Additional Information: A classic Dan mask with an elongated lozenge  face characterized by  pointed cheecks, a large open mouth, a strong nose, a high pointed head. 


This mask is called Deangle or Tangle. Thought to portray a female, it dances in a style thought to be feminine, with gliding steps and graceful movements. Deangle dances for all to see as "she" entertains and instructs the village in peaceful pursuits. Each Deangle mask reflects the skill of the artist and taste of the patron, and while local variations occur, there are long established criteria for Deangle that reflect a continuum in Dan cultural aesthetic and styles. The face is surrounded by holes , which had used to attach a complex costume designed to enhance her appearance and to complete the mask. In some case cowrie shells, bras teeth metal bells, and beads would be  attached to the costume and the headdress  that surrounds her forehead. On the offered example, the coiffure is carved with several plaits and beautifully decorated with cowrie shells, and beads. The forehead is also embellished with beads. 


Recommended Reading: G. Schwab: "Tribes of the Liberian Hinterland," ed. G. W. Harley, Papers Peabody Museum, Archaeology & Ethnology, xxxi (Cambridge, MA, 1947) W. Siegmann and Cynthia Schmidt, "Rock of the Ancestors," (Suacoco, 1977) E. Fischer and Hans Himmelheber: "The Arts of the Dan in West Africa," (Zurich, 1984) E. Fischer “Dan Forest Spirits: Masks in Dan Villages”, African Arts, II, no. 2, 1978. pp. 16-23, 94 B. C. Johnson: "Four Dan Sculptors: Continuity and Change," (San Francisco, 1986)


 


I have examined this piece and agree with the description.
Niangi Batulukisi, PhD.