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Luvale Makishi Mask Zambia African Art

$490.00
Product #: 113301
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Title Luvale Makishi Mask Zambia African Art
Type of Object Mask 
Country of Origin Zambia
People Luvale or Lovale
Materials wood, cotton thread, vegetal fiber, pigment/paint
Approximate Age second half or late 20th century
Dimensions Height: 20 Inches
Width: 16.5 Inches
Overall Condition Fair. Most of our pieces have spent decades on at least two continents, and have been treasured by several owners.   Small splits, scrapes and cracks are a normal part of their patina attesting to their age and extensive use.  We examine each piece carefully when we receive it and report any damage we find in our listings.  Please look carefully at the pictures which may also reveal condition and damage.
Damage/Repair Chipped and cracked pigment. Stained cloth, and broken reeds in back.


Additional Information:   The Lovale are relatives of the Chokwe and are known as the Lwena in Angola and the south of the DRC. They have scattered into small groups due to the many wars that were fought within the old Lunda Empire. Because of their location on the Zambezi River they mainly fish for a living. They primarily produce masks in Human and animal form, used at initiations and for appeasement of the spirits of other world. Makishi is the generic term for masks. Makishi represent both male and female characters. They play a significant role during the mukanda, ritual of initiation and circumcision of young boys.  While dancing, these masks have the power to dispense fertility to the audience and insure the strength of young initiates. They play several characters. Some of them display an aggressive behavior and are feared by women and children.  


Such masks are very rare compare to the wooden masks. This one would stand well in any collection of African masks for what it represents.


Recommended Reading


Manuel Jordan (Ed.) CHOKWE!


Description written by Niangi Batulukisi, Ph.D.